{"id":10641577871,"title":"Dance-O-Mania: Harry Yerkes and the Dawn of the Jazz Age (1919-1923)","handle":"the-happy-six-dance-o-mania-bsw-1150","description":"\u003cp\u003eAlthough the name of Harry Yerkes is all but forgotten, in his heyday -- the late 1910s to the mid-1920s -- he was one of the most important and influential figures on the New York music scene, especially in the field of record-making. By 1920 Yerkes had virtually cornered the market in the supply of dance orchestras to record companies, his various groups recording for nearly every record company with a studio in New York. These included saxophone sextets, small novelty groups which frequently employed early jazz musicians, marimba bands, and conventional dance orchestras. Added to this was a very successful band booking agency which, as well as providing bands for locally-based engagements, sent bands out on the road in vaudeville, with touring shows across the USA, Canada, and even as far afield as Britain and Australia! From his office in the Metropolitan Opera House Building, Harry Yerkes ran a musical empire that was unrivaled in its stylistic diversity and connections. Yet, by the mid-1920s he had been eclipsed by younger men such as Paul Whiteman and Sam Lanin, and his name and those of his bands had all but dropped off the music industry radar. The commanding lead he had built in the development of dance bands in the late 1910s and his pioneering role in effectively inventing the dance band had been usurped, reformulated, and reshaped.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eThe Happy Six was Yerkes's pioneering jazz dance band that featured such New Orleans legends as trombonist Tom Brown and clarinetist Alcide Nunez alongside studio pros such as saxophonists Ross Gorman and Rudy Wiedoeft. In the relatively short span of five years, the Happy Six recorded nearly a hundred issued sides, twenty-five of which have been selected and meticulously restored from excellent-condition original 78 rpm records for this CD. The handsome 28-page booklet that accompanies the disc is packed with rare photographs, full discographical information, and Mark Berresford's comprehensive, Grammy-nominated liner notes, drawing upon his extensive groundbreaking research. The Happy Six provide a fascinating lens through which to study a musically-rich time in American popular music as the public's taste shifted from ragtime to jazz. Much of their music is cheerful, quirky, idiosyncratic, and frequently, quite daring and experimental. 78 minutes.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cem\u003eRivermont catalogue number: BSW-1150\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2017-03-24T22:30:00-04:00","created_at":"2017-03-24T22:34:51-04:00","vendor":"The Happy Six","type":"Rivermont","tags":["1910s","1920s","BSW-1000","Dance Band","Jazz","Ragtime"],"price":1595,"price_min":1595,"price_max":1595,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":1595,"compare_at_price_min":1595,"compare_at_price_max":1595,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":39426774095,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"1150","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Dance-O-Mania: Harry Yerkes and the Dawn of the Jazz Age (1919-1923)","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":1595,"weight":142,"compare_at_price":1595,"inventory_quantity":-1,"inventory_management":null,"inventory_policy":"deny","barcode":"620953362026"}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1847\/5227\/products\/1150-cover-1500pxh.jpg?v=1490409293","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1847\/5227\/products\/1150-back-1500pxh.jpg?v=1490409295"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1847\/5227\/products\/1150-cover-1500pxh.jpg?v=1490409293","options":["Title"],"content":"\u003cp\u003eAlthough the name of Harry Yerkes is all but forgotten, in his heyday -- the late 1910s to the mid-1920s -- he was one of the most important and influential figures on the New York music scene, especially in the field of record-making. By 1920 Yerkes had virtually cornered the market in the supply of dance orchestras to record companies, his various groups recording for nearly every record company with a studio in New York. These included saxophone sextets, small novelty groups which frequently employed early jazz musicians, marimba bands, and conventional dance orchestras. Added to this was a very successful band booking agency which, as well as providing bands for locally-based engagements, sent bands out on the road in vaudeville, with touring shows across the USA, Canada, and even as far afield as Britain and Australia! From his office in the Metropolitan Opera House Building, Harry Yerkes ran a musical empire that was unrivaled in its stylistic diversity and connections. Yet, by the mid-1920s he had been eclipsed by younger men such as Paul Whiteman and Sam Lanin, and his name and those of his bands had all but dropped off the music industry radar. The commanding lead he had built in the development of dance bands in the late 1910s and his pioneering role in effectively inventing the dance band had been usurped, reformulated, and reshaped.\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eThe Happy Six was Yerkes's pioneering jazz dance band that featured such New Orleans legends as trombonist Tom Brown and clarinetist Alcide Nunez alongside studio pros such as saxophonists Ross Gorman and Rudy Wiedoeft. In the relatively short span of five years, the Happy Six recorded nearly a hundred issued sides, twenty-five of which have been selected and meticulously restored from excellent-condition original 78 rpm records for this CD. The handsome 28-page booklet that accompanies the disc is packed with rare photographs, full discographical information, and Mark Berresford's comprehensive, Grammy-nominated liner notes, drawing upon his extensive groundbreaking research. The Happy Six provide a fascinating lens through which to study a musically-rich time in American popular music as the public's taste shifted from ragtime to jazz. Much of their music is cheerful, quirky, idiosyncratic, and frequently, quite daring and experimental. 78 minutes.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cem\u003eRivermont catalogue number: BSW-1150\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e"}
The Happy Six

Dance-O-Mania: Harry Yerkes and the Dawn of the Jazz Age (1919-1923)

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Although the name of Harry Yerkes is all but forgotten, in his heyday -- the late 1910s to the mid-1920s -- he was one of the most important and influential figures on the New York music scene, especially in the field of record-making. By 1920 Yerkes had virtually cornered the market in the supply of dance orchestras to record companies, his various groups recording for nearly every record company with a studio in New York. These included saxophone sextets, small novelty groups which frequently employed early jazz musicians, marimba bands, and conventional dance orchestras. Added to this was a very successful band booking agency which, as well as providing bands for locally-based engagements, sent bands out on the road in vaudeville, with touring shows across the USA, Canada, and even as far afield as Britain and Australia! From his office in the Metropolitan Opera House Building, Harry Yerkes ran a musical empire that was unrivaled in its stylistic diversity and connections. Yet, by the mid-1920s he had been eclipsed by younger men such as Paul Whiteman and Sam Lanin, and his name and those of his bands had all but dropped off the music industry radar. The commanding lead he had built in the development of dance bands in the late 1910s and his pioneering role in effectively inventing the dance band had been usurped, reformulated, and reshaped.

The Happy Six was Yerkes's pioneering jazz dance band that featured such New Orleans legends as trombonist Tom Brown and clarinetist Alcide Nunez alongside studio pros such as saxophonists Ross Gorman and Rudy Wiedoeft. In the relatively short span of five years, the Happy Six recorded nearly a hundred issued sides, twenty-five of which have been selected and meticulously restored from excellent-condition original 78 rpm records for this CD. The handsome 28-page booklet that accompanies the disc is packed with rare photographs, full discographical information, and Mark Berresford's comprehensive, Grammy-nominated liner notes, drawing upon his extensive groundbreaking research. The Happy Six provide a fascinating lens through which to study a musically-rich time in American popular music as the public's taste shifted from ragtime to jazz. Much of their music is cheerful, quirky, idiosyncratic, and frequently, quite daring and experimental. 78 minutes.

Rivermont catalogue number: BSW-1150

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